Honoring those who serve and protect us…

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By Alex Quintela

A few days ago I posted to the blog but I just realized that it was incomplete. For that I apologize. Here is the post in it’s entirety…….

Somewhere along the line, our country and society has lost track of two key principles: objectivity and accountability. Just as people demand transparency and accountability from law enforcement agencies, they must hold themselves and each other accountable for their actions.

Recently in many inner cities, there has been an outcry from minorities within the community – that police should focus on major crimes (shootings, rape and the like) rather than ordinary crime (vandalism, trespassing and the like).

Since when did “small crime” not become crime? Why is it that people attempt to hold the police responsible yet lack the courage to hold others accountable? How about the community’s failure to hold its own people responsible?

Introducing the broken windows theory – an assertion that many Americans treat like history – they learn nothing from it.

If you don’t fix the window, it means you don’t care -and if you don’t care, you open the door or proverbial “Pandora’s Box” to those with ulterior motives waiting to take advantage of the situation.

To be clear, the recent and tragic deaths of Police Officers nationwide is a just that – a tragedy – they had nothing to do with the other incidents in question.

Police officers are not the reason for drugs and gangs plaguing a neighborhood – the community and it’s members are. How so? –
Edmund Burke once said, “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.” It is not uncommon to find people unwilling to denounce criminals and wrongdoers in communities where crime and poverty are rampant.

Police officers are not responsible for ensuring parents raise their children in a manner that allows them to be productive members of society – they certainly aren’t responsible for ensuring they come home when it is dark out. It is up to mom, dad, other family members or community members that are influential in a child’s life – regardless of race – to foster and instill behaviors that are morally and ethically responsible.

Communities must realize that the government alone will not create jobs or invigorate the economy nor should it sustain the livelihood of individuals. They must not blame the police, government or any race for their failure to thrive, lack of education or for allowing drugs, gangs and poverty to infiltrate and subsequently run their communities.

Accountability starts from within – that is, individuals. It is extended when said individuals reject the notion of entitlement and demand the value of hard work. I grew up in the inner city – a product of Cuban parents that would eventually divorce during my teenage years. Rather than protest or cry, I choose to work hard in order to get ahead. That same ethic must become the will of others that claim to be less fortunate, if they expect to succeed.

History has proven that the less government is involved in these issues, the more prosperity communities enjoy. This is because economies thrive on the hard work, blood, sweat and tears of individuals or entrepreneurs that make positive contributions to society and its communities. It is ignorant to expect any level of government to increase access to wealth, education, etc. – just as it is to claim it is “harassment” when the police arrest a minority or person of color that commits a crime.

The narrative of the so-called oppressed will never change unless they first understand and accept this. No one should cater to anyone.

As I mentioned before, maintaining objectivity is important in any discussion – to that effect – yes, there are those out there that are corrupt and abuse their powers frequently, but the majority of government officials and police officers are good, hard-working people that care about the people within the communities they serve.

Those police officers that serve with integrity but find themselves generalized with the bad and subsequently under siege lately, are no different from the so-called oppressed – for they find themselves as victims in this situation as well.

With the exception of the case in South Carolina, every other “innocent victim” involved in the recent, controversial police-involved shootings has had a significant criminal record.

Logically, nothing good can come from frequent trouble – but where are the community leaders denouncing that? I suppose that would be maintaining objectivity and accountability though and those two died a long time ago.

Cops Protest


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